How Dehydration Affects the Skin

Everyone deals with dehydrated skin at some point or another. This typically happens during the winter or even from an unhealthy diet. There is a difference between dry skin and dehydrated skin, however. Dry skin is typically categorized as a skin type, determined by your genetics, hormonal imbalances or even an underactive thyroid. Usually your skin can’t produce enough sebum, so your skin becomes dry and lackluster. Whereas dehydrated skin just doesn’t have enough moisture in the skin. In simpler terms, dehydrated skin is a lack of water while dry skin is a lack of oil. Keep reading below to learn how dehydration affects the skin.

How Dehydration Affects the Skin

Your skin needs water just like the rest of your body. Skin cells use water as nourishment to revitalize and renew. And when you don’t have enough moisture, your skin may develop certain conditions and even aging sign. Basically, water is one of the most important components of your body. And when you’re dehydrated, priority is given to more vital organs such as the liver, brains, heart, and lungs. In fact, connective tissue, like collagen, is one of the first things to stop functioning. And this can cause an entire array of problems. Keep reading below to learn more!

Skin Disorders And Issues

Your skin is comprised of about 63% water. Basically, water is necessary for your cells to transport nutrients and minerals, as well as to eliminate toxins and waste. So, when you’re dehydrated, your skin can no longer remove these toxins. Which, in turn, can cause skin problems and disorders. Some of these include, but aren’t limited to, eczema, psoriasis, discoloration, and itchy, dry skin. If you are experiencing any of these issues, it may be worth your time to consciously up your water intake. Speak with a medical professional for more advice.

Signs Of Aging

Inadequate moisture in the skin is typically caused by a process called transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Basically, when your collagen production centers slow down (whether due to aging or dehydration), your skin has trouble retaining moisture. Instead, it’s evaporated into the air. Without enough moisture, your skin just can’t keep up with the renewal process. So, fine lines and wrinkles start to appear. A general dull complexion and a change in skin texture is also a sign of dehydration. And if you’re severely dehydrated, you may notice sunken eyes and darker under-eye circles.

Tips For Healthy, Hydrated Skin:

Drink a lot of water – always keep a bottle of water around you, and drink so much that that your urine is light yellow in color.
Eat lots of vegetables and less fruits – fruits are usually chock full of sugars, so it’s best to choose green vegetables. Spinach, kale, and celery are just some examples.
Moisturize – skin care products with hyaluronic acid is great for restoring hydration to the skin cells. Hyaluronic acid in particular can hold up to 1000x its weight in water, which your thirsty skin just soaks up.

Other Signs That You May Be Dehydrated

If you still don’t know whether you have dry or dehydrated skin, there are other symptoms and signs to look for. A mild to moderate dehydrated state will give you a dry, sticky mouth. You may also feel more tired than usual and you may be nursing a headache or lightheadedness. Another good way to check on your state of hydration is to check your urine. Darker yellows and orange signify you are already dehydrated, but minimal urination is a sign of extreme dehydration.

How To Prevent Dehydration

Dehydration is serious condition and it’s best to listen to your body to avoid it. There’s a common saying, that if you’re thirsty, you’re already very dehydrated. Remember, everyone is at risk for dehydration, so make sure you’re urinating at least 7 to 8 times each day. Because if you’re not going that often, you’re not drinking enough water. As often as you can, opt for filtered water rather than soft drinks or even juices. Plumper, brighter, and healthier skin is just a sip away.

Todd Ruggets
Todd Ruggets

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